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We all strive for purpose and understanding, to hear and to be heard, to see and to be seen, to leave this world a better place than we found it. 

"Let's Be Better Humans" is a reminder that we exist for one another, that we can make difference and help bring a return to human dignity. In short, we are a revolution in love and humanity.

Our message is a simple, but profound statement that hopes to inspire, motivate and produce change.


The Bronfman Family Foundation has provided our project the gift of a “Magic Bus” and in this contribution, a broader purpose. Our “Let’s Be Better Humans” message is a simple, but profound statement that hopes to inspire, motivate and produce change


This rolling piece of humanity is used weekly to deliver food, water, clothing and other essential items to the less fortunate. Further, our initiative has participated in peaceful actions against deportation, bigotry and isolationism. We stand proudly with our friends from Planned Parenthood, the LGBTQ, Native American, Muslim and communities from every race, creed and color. This campaign in compassion embraces the ideal of bridges over walls and has graciously demonstrated help for our neighbors across a southern border. This humble movement asks that you to join us hand-in-hand as we work tirelessly to a give voice to the downtrodden and silenced.


Let's Be Better Humans is a registered 501C-3. Your donations are not only tax-deductible but will help us help someone in need. 


Together we can make a difference. 

Lee

In a derelict part of downtown Phoenix, a woman sits quietly on a dirty sidewalk. She is seemingly immune to a loud group of men who are rolling dice against the curb. With a full face of white make-up, she is hard to ignore! I walk past and ask if she’d like a cigarette? She gently nods, yes!

She has an easy spirit and I wonder what’s brought this woman to the street. In a hushed voice she shares, “My name is Lee.” I ask her age and how long she’s been homeless but quickly realize Lee is reticent to share her age. As I offer an apology she gestures with a finger to come closer. When I lean in, she whispers, “I am a very old woman and have been here a long, long time.”

As I walk away it’s impossible to ignore that we’ve failed as a First-World country when we allow our elderly citizenry to call a place like this home!

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Xavier

On-and-off the streets since the tender age 13. Xavier was asked to leave his parents home because of a drug habit. “Heroin and meth. I shoot heroine. I don’t fuck around.”

“Have you overdosed?, I ask. With no hesitation he responds, “Too many times to count”, the young man goes on to say, “I have no ambitions. I don’t know how to be normal anymore. It’s sad but this is my reality.”

 
 

Lee

In a derelict part of downtown Phoenix, a woman sits quietly on a dirty sidewalk. She is seemingly immune to a loud group of men who are rolling dice against the curb. With a full face of white make-up, she is hard to ignore! I walk past and ask if she’d like a cigarette? She gently nods, yes!

She has an easy spirit and I wonder what’s brought this woman to the street. In a hushed voice she shares, “My name is Lee.” I ask her age and how long she’s been homeless but quickly realize Lee is reticent to share her age. As I offer an apology she gestures with a finger to come closer. When I lean in, she whispers, “I am a very old woman and have been here a long, long time.”

As I walk away it’s impossible to ignore that we’ve failed as a First-World country when we allow our elderly citizenry to call a place like this home!

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Xavier

On-and-off the streets since the tender age 13. Xavier was asked to leave his parents home because of a drug habit. “Heroin and meth. I shoot heroine. I don’t fuck around.”

“Have you overdosed?, I ask. With no hesitation he responds, “Too many times to count”, the young man goes on to say, “I have no ambitions. I don’t know how to be normal anymore. It’s sad but this is my reality.”

Keyla is a two-year-old from El Salvador.

This precious child has called Casa Del Migrante (House of the Migrant) home for half of her young life.

El Salvador has one of the highest rates of crime and murder in the world. The country has been labeled, “the most violent in Latin America.” Further, many children do not end up attending school due to financial or economic reasons.

Mother and child fled the country in December of 2019 with dreams of a better life and the hope of asylum.

Let’s pray 2021 brings Gabriela and her precious daughter a future of peace and promise.

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Sopieha

This 38-year-old, who identifies as female, sits in a Tucson park where many of the unsheltered find refuge.

Those who call this place home become a family of sorts and all look out for one another. She has lived in the Santa Rita park for almost 12 years.

Sopieha is shy in demeanor and speaks with a gentle voice. When asked about the difficulty of suffering through chronic homelessness she softly offers, “Simply surviving day-to-day is a real struggle.”

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Mark

Mark sits on a downtown corner enjoying the last of the summer weather.

 

The 60-yr-old from Kenosha shares a story about seeing snow here in July.

 

Mark redirects his gaze and with a glimmer in his eyes adds, “I tell ya’ people never believe me but it really happened.”

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Underneath the streets of Mexico City, amidst a very crowded subway car, this Nicaraguan refugee makes a desperate and heartbreaking plea for help.

With tears streaming down his face he apologizes for the interruption.

This man painfully cries out for grace as he and his wife are hungry and have nowhere to go.

Can you imagine the horrible feeling of leaving your home, headed for an unknown place with an uncertain future? Lost in the world...